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LanceGreenfieldMitchell

Par Lance

Par Lance is where I come to talk with my friends, mainly to discuss books. 

Par can mean at face value,and Lance is just me.

 

From the Oxford English Dictionary:

Parlance /'pa:l(Ə)ns/

noun [mass noun] a particular way of speaking or using words, especially a way common to those with a particular job or interest: dated terms that were once in common parlance | medical parlance.

origin late 16th cent. (denoting speech or debate): from Old French, from parler 'speak', from Latin parabola 'comparison' (in late Latin 'speech').

Currently reading

Secrets of Mental Math: The Mathemagician's Guide to Lightning Calculation and Amazing Math Tricks
Arthur Benjamin
Stephens' C# Programming with Visual Studio 2010 24-Hour Trainer
Rod Stephens
The Stonor Eagles
WILLIAM HORWOOD
The Angel's Game (The Cemetery of Forgotten Books, #2) - Carlos Ruiz Zafón Dark and sinister


This is the macabre and sinister tale of David Martín, a journalist who turns to writing books. Initially, these are regularly churned out, trashy stories, written purely for income. I won’t tell where he progresses to, or describe any of the weird events that ensue, for fear of spoiling this wonderfully intriguing story for you. Suffice to say that this book is packed with action and mystery.

If you build an affinity with a strongly crafted character, then you are in danger of becoming quite depressed as you follow the exploits of unfortunate David Martín. He lives out his life in dull sepia. If anything could ever go wrong for the poor chap, it did. If he went to Heaven, St Peter would show him to the worst suite in the place and show him a bed of nails on which he may rest.

Despite all this, Martín’s tale is so compelling that you cannot leave it until you have read to the last sentence of the book.

Although the events described in The Angel’s Game precede those of Shadow of the Wind, there are clear connections between the characters and places which are featured in both books. The magical writing of Zafón is, once more, captivating. However, if I were to rank the two books against each other, I would say that Shadow would slightly edge it. There were times in this book when a discomforting feeling of boredom started to impinge on my enjoyment. Overall. It is a wonderful book and deserves five stars.